What is Lazy Eye (Amblyopia)?

History
Lazy Eye Treatment - A Brief History - 900 A.D. to Today
by Susan R. Barry, Ph.D.

New Scientific Research!
Treatment After Age 7...

Lazy Eye Treatment and Cure in Older Children and Adults
by neurobiologist Susan R. Barry, Ph.D. and Rachel Cooper

Fix a Lazy Eye at Any Age!
Age is Not a Factor in How to Fix a Lazy Eye
by Rachel Cooper

Find an Eye Doctor
Treatment for Lazy Eye by Board Certified Specialists

How to Correct Lazy Eye without Surgery...What is Vision Therapy?

How to Fix a Lazy Eye in Children and Adults with Eye Exercises (Vision Therapy)

Lazy Eye Surgery

The information on this advertising-free patient education site is sponsored by Optometrists Network, Senior Editor Rachel Cooper, with special thanks to the following non-profits:
- American Optometric Association (AOA) Infantsee program
- College of Optometrists in Vision Development (COVD)
- Optometric Extension Program Foundation (OEPF)

Amblyopia, commonly known as lazy eye, causes more visual loss in the under 40 age group than all the injuries and diseases combined in this age group.

Amblyopia, commonly known as lazy eye, is the eye condition noted by reduced vision not correctable by glasses or contact lenses and is not due to any eye disease. The brain, for some reason, does not fully acknowledge the images seen by the amblyopic eye. This almost always affects only one eye but may manifest with reduction of vision in both eyes. It is estimated that three percent of children under six have some form of amblyopia.

Summary:

  • Lazy Eye is an eye condition in which there is blurry or reduced vision that is not correctable by glasses, contact lenses or eye surgery
  • Lazy eye can cause loss of vision, including loss of depth perception and two-eyed 3D vision.
  • Lazy eye treatment can yield improvements at any age, but early detection and treatment still offer easier treatment and the best chances for a cure.
  • Scientific research has proven that lazy eye treatment can be successful in older children, teenagers, and adults. Neuroscience has established that the human brain can change at any age (neuroplasticity).
  • Comprehensive vision examinations are needed for infants, toddlers, and pre-school children. A pediatrician's eye exam or a 20/20 eye chart screening is not adequate for the detection of amblyopia and other visual conditions which are related to or mistakenly called lazy eye.